I would like to know how well the current system, for deciding if the washing machine is running, is working.

I'll try to get the info from InfluxDB. It should be in there.
I would like to know how well the current system, for deciding if the washing machine is running, is working.

I'll try to get the info from InfluxDB. It should be in there.
I would like to know how well the current system, for deciding if the washing machine is running, is working.

I'll try to get the info from InfluxDB. It should be in there.
Sometimes a solution can be very simple. Graphing numbers and boolean: temperature and heating. Add the temperatures to the left axis and the heating state to the right axis with min and max as 0 and 1 respectively.

Yesterday I flashed the final 2 of 8 Teckin SP22 Smart Sockets with ESPHome according to the guide at Intermittent Technology.

I did have to make some changes to the esphome.yaml code. Finally it looks like this:

esphome:
  name: esphome00
  platform: ESP8266
  board: esp8285

wifi:
  ssid: !secret wifi_ssid
  password: !secret wifi_password
  manual_ip:
    static_ip: !secret esphome_esp00_static_ip
    gateway: !secret wifi_gateway
    subnet: !secret wifi_subnet
    dns1: !secret wifi_dns1
    dns2: !secret wifi_dns2

# Enable logging
logger:

# Enable Home Assistant API
api:

ota:

binary_sensor:
  - platform: gpio
    pin:
      number: GPIO1
      inverted: True
    name: "esphome00_button"

switch:
- platform: gpio
  name: "esphome00_relay"
  pin: GPIO14
  restore_mode: RESTORE_DEFAULT_OFF
- platform: gpio
  name: "esphome00_led_blue"
  pin: GPIO13
  inverted: True
  restore_mode: ALWAYS_OFF
- platform: gpio
  name: "esphome00_led_red"
  pin: GPIO3
  inverted: True
  restore_mode: ALWAYS_OFF
- platform: restart
  id: esphome00_restart
  name: "ESPHome00 restart"

sensor:
  - platform: hlw8012
    sel_pin:
      number: GPIO12
      inverted: True
    cf_pin: GPIO04
    cf1_pin: GPIO05
    # Higher value gives lower watt readout
    current_resistor: 0.00221
    # Lower value gives lower voltage readout
    voltage_divider: 871
    current:
      name: "esphome00_current"
      unit_of_measurement: A
    voltage:
      name: "esphome00_voltage"
      unit_of_measurement: V
    power:
      name: "esphome00_power"
      unit_of_measurement: W
      id: "esphome00_power"
    change_mode_every: 8
    update_interval: 10s
  - platform: wifi_signal
    name: "esphome00_wifi_rssi"
    update_interval: 60s

  # Extra sensor to keep track of plug uptime
  - platform: uptime
    name: esphome00_uptime

text_sensor:
  - platform: version
    name: "esphome00_version"
Ekster was mentioned at the Social Readers presentation by @aaronpk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdDfAaYy0_U
Home Assistant contains a component to control an OpenTherm Gateway, but it seemed not very stable. The gateway sometimes has timeouts and these also happen in Home Assistant. The problem was that HA stopped in the middle of the night and became unresponsive. To resolve this problem I have created a go program that copies temperatures from and to the gateway. This is a lot more stable as the timeouts don't hinder the processing. With a input_select component and a few automations I now have a more stable and responsive heating control system.
I'm currently improving the auth handling of the micropub node for Node-RED
With help from drone and home assistant I get a notification and a green light when the build succeeds. Now I don't have to check the drone panel on successful builds.
With ek it's easy to create a backup script for your Micropub feeds. Just call ek export json and save it to a file and add a cronjob.

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